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See how Hoosiers did at the Tokyo Olympics

Nearly 40 athletes with Indiana ties traveled to Tokyo in the quest for gold.
Credit: AP/Dmitri Lovetsky
Andrew Capobianco and Michael Hixon of the United States' pose for photo after winning silver medals during the men's Synchronized 3m Springboard Final at the Tokyo Aquatics Centre at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Wednesday, July 28, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan.

TOKYO, Japan — More than 600 athletes represented the United States at the Tokyo Olympics and a number of them were from Indiana.

The Hoosier state was well-represented in Tokyo, bringing home 10 gold medals, 5 silver and 7 bronze.

Here is how each athlete with Hoosier ties fared at the 2020 Tokyo Games. 

Skylar Diggins-Smith and Jewell Loyd — Basketball

Credit: AP/Charlie Neibergall
United States players pose with their gold medals during the medal ceremony for women's basketball at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Sunday, Aug. 8, 2021, in Saitama, Japan. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

South Bend native and University of Notre Dame graduate Skylar Diggins-Smith and University of Notre Dame graduate Jewell Loyd were part of the 12 person roster.

Team USA won its seventh consecutive gold medal in women's basketball, defeating Japan 90-75 in the finals.

Loyd scored 3 points in the finals, and Diggins-Smith did not score in Team USA's victory.

Credit: AP/Charlie Neibergall
United States' Skylar Diggins (5) drives to the basket ahead of Serbia's Yvonne Anderson (12) during women's basketball semifinal game at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Friday, Aug. 6, 2021, in Saitama, Japan.

The U.S. defeated Serbia in the semifinals, Australia in the quarterfinals and went undefeated in Group B of the preliminary round, with wins against France, Japan and Nigeria.

Diggins-Smith plays for the Phoenix Mercury in the WNBA, while Loyd plays for the Seattle Storm. 

Credit: AP/Eric Gay
United States' Jewell Loyd (4) drives up court during women's basketball semifinal game against Serbia at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Friday, Aug. 6, 2021, in Saitama, Japan.

Jackie Young — 3-on-3 Women's Basketball

Credit: AP/Jeff Roberson
Members of team United States, from left to right, Kelsey Plum, Jacquelyn Young, Stefanie Dolson and Allisha Gray pose with their gold medals during the awards ceremony for women's 3-on-3 basketball at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Wednesday, July 28, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan.

Princeton, Indiana native and former University of Notre Dame student Jackie Young is a gold medalist.  

Young, Stefanie Dolson, Allisha Gray and her Las Vegas Aces teammate Kelsey Plum won the inaugural women's 3x3 basketball tournament at the Tokyo Olympics.

RELATED: Rules of the Game: 3-on-3 basketball

Team USA defeated France 18-16 in the semifinals and ROC 18-15 in the gold medal game. Young scored 2 points in the final game.

Young was a late replacement in the 3-on-3 women's basketball tournament after Katie Lou Samuelson tested positive for COVID-19 while training in Las Vegas.

Chloé Dygert — Cycling

Credit: AP/Tim de Waele
Chloé Dygert of the United States competes during the women's cycling individual time trial at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Wednesday, July 28, 2021, in Oyama, Japan.

Chloé Dygert was born in Indianapolis and now calls Brownsburg home. She competed in three Olympic events in Tokyo: women's road race, women's individual time trial and women's team pursuit.

In the team pursuit, Dygert and Team USA lost to Great Britain in the first round by less than 1 second, which meant they could not win the gold medal. However, Team USA's time of 4:07.562 in the first round was fast enough to earn them a place in the bronze medal race against Canada, whom they defeated by more than 1 second with a time of 4:08.040 to place third.

RELATED: Brownsburg's Chloé Dygert uses passion for competition in pursuit of Olympic gold

Dygert finished seventh in the individual time trial with a time of 32:29.89 and finished 31st in the road race.

Dygert won a silver medal at the 2016 Rio Olympics in the team pursuit.

Coryn Rivera — Cycling

Credit: AP
United States' Coryn Rivera competes during the women's elite event, at the road cycling World Championships, in Imola, Italy, Saturday, Sept. 26, 2020. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Marian University graduate Coryn Rivera competed against Dygert in the women's road race. Rivera placed seventh in the event with a time of 3:54:31.

Felicia Stancil — Cycling BMX Racing

Credit: AP/Ben Curtis
Felicia Stancil, of the United States, raced in the women's BMX Racing quarterfinals at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Thursday, July 29, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan.

Indianapolis resident and Marian University graduate Felicia Stancil competed in her first Olympic Games.

Stancil finished fourth in the women's BMX Racing in Tokyo with a time of 45.131 seconds.

The semifinals were delayed by heavy rain. Once they began, Stancil finished second in the first run of her heat, dropped to fourth in the second run, but won the final run to enter the final as the top seed in her heat. 

She raced out with the lead pack during the final, but came home in fourth, just off the podium.

Annie Drews — Volleyball

Credit: AP/Frank Augstein
United States' Andrea Drews, above, spikes as Brazil's Gabriel Braga Guimaraes defends during the gold medal match in women's volleyball at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Sunday, Aug. 8, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan.

Elkhart native and Purdue University graduate Annie Drews joined the U.S. women's volleyball team for her first Olympics.

Team USA won the gold medal after beating Brazil in the finals, 3-0. Drews had the most points for the U.S. in the victory, scoring 15.

The U.S. beat Serbia in the semifinals, the Dominican Republic in the quarterfinals and finished first in Pool B of the preliminary round with a 4-1 record after beating Argentina, China, Turkey, and Italy but losing to ROC.

Michael Hixon — Diving

Credit: AP/Dmitri Lovetsky
Andrew Capobianco and Michael Hixon of the United States' pose for photo after winning silver medals during the men's Synchronized 3m Springboard Final at the Tokyo Aquatics Centre at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Wednesday, July 28, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan.

Indiana University graduate Michael Hixon won silver for Team USA in the men's synchronized 3-meter springboard diving event.

Hixon and current IU student Andrew Capobianco finished with a score of 444.36, about 23 points behind China and nearly 40 points ahead of Germany, who won bronze.

Hixon won a silver medal in the same event at the Rio Olympics five years ago.

Andrew Capobianco — Diving

Credit: AP/Alesandra Tarantino
Andrew Capobianco of United States competes in men's diving 3-meter springboard final at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, Aug. 3, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan.

Andrew Capobianco, a 21-year-old student at Indiana University, competed in two diving events at his first Olympics.

Capobianco teamed with IU graduate Michael Hixon to win the silver medal in the men's synchronized 3-meter springboard event with a score of 444.36.

Capobianco then made it through the preliminaries and semifinals of the men's 3-meter springboard diving event. However, Capobianco didn't quite pull it off the finals. Although his first two dives put him in medal contention, he was fighting a back injury and ended up 10th with 401.70 points. China earned gold and silver, while Great Britain won bronze.

Brandon Loschiavo — Diving

Credit: AP/Dmitri Lovetsky
Brandon Loschiavo of Team United States competes in men's diving 10m platform semifinal at the Tokyo Aquatics Centre at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Saturday, Aug. 7, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan.

Purdue University student Brandon Loschiavo competed in his first Olympics in the men's 10-meter platform diving event.

Loschiavo made it through the preliminary and semifinal rounds but finished 11th out of 12 divers in the finals with a score of 383.65. Yuan Cao, of China, won gold with a score of 582.35.

Loschiavo is a five-time national champion, with four wins in synchronized 10-meter diving and one title for individual 10-meter diving.

Tyler Downs — Diving

Credit: AP/Alessandra Tarantino
Tyler Downs of United States competes in men's diving 3m springboard preliminary at the Tokyo Aquatics Centre at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Monday, Aug. 2, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan.

Tyler Downs, a 17-year-old Purdue recruit from Fishers, competed in the men's 3-meter springboard diving competition.

Downs finished 23rd in the preliminary round and did not advance to the semifinals, scoring 348.70.

Jessica Parratto — Diving

Credit: AP/Dmitri Lovetsky
Jessica Parratto (right) and Delaney Schnell (left) of the United States' pose for a photo after winning silver medals during the women's synchronized 10m platform diving final at the Tokyo Aquatics Centre at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 27, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan.

Jessica Parratto, a 2019 Indiana University graduate, competed in the women's synchronized 10-meter platform diving event.

Parratto and partner Delaney Schnell earned silver medals with 310.80 points for their routine, with China winning gold.

Drew Kibler — Swimming

Credit: AP/Charie Riedel
Drew Kibler of the United States, dives in for the men's 4 x 200-meter freestyle relay at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 27, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan.

Drew Kibler became the first swimmer from Carmel to reach the Olympics.

Kibler helped Team USA advance to the finals of the men's 4x200-meter freestyle relay with a time of 7:05.62 in the heat.

Kibler also swam in the finals, but the U.S. finished fourth, behind Great Britain, ROC, and Australia, with a time of 7:02.43.

Michael Brinegar — Swimming

Credit: AP/Jae C. Hong
Michael Brinegar, of United States, swims in a men's 1500-meter freestyle heat at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Friday, July 30, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan.

Columbus native and IU student Michael Brinegar competed in two swimming events in Tokyo.

In the 800-meter freestyle event, Brinegar finished seventh in his heat with a time of 7:53.00 but did not advance to the finals.

Brinegar finished fifth in the second heat of the men's 1,500-meter freestyle event with a time of 15:04.67 but did not qualify for the finals.

Jake Mitchell — Swimming

Credit: AP/Martin Meissner
Jake Mitchell, of the United States, left, and teammate Kieran Smith react following their heat of the men's 400-meter freestyle at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Saturday, July 24, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan.

Carmel High School graduate Jake Mitchell swam in his first Olympics in the men's 400-meter freestyle event.

RELATED: Carmel swim program in a league of its own

Mitchell was one of eight divers to advance to the finals with a time of 3:45.38 in the final preliminary heat.

He finished eighth in the finals with a time of 3:45.39. Ahmed Hafnaoui, of Tunisia, won gold with a time of 3:43.36.

Zach Apple — Swimming

Credit: AP/David Goldman
The United States' men's 4x100-meter medley relay team, from left to right, Ryan Murphy, Michael Andrew, Caeleb Dressel, and Zach Apple, poses after winning the gold medal at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Sunday, Aug. 1, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan. (AP Photo/David Goldman)

IU graduate Zach Apple swam in four events in Tokyo.

Apple swam in both the heat and finals of the 4x100-meter freestyle relay to help Team USA win the gold medal with a time in the finals of 3:08.97.

Apple sat out of the qualifying heat in the 4x100-meter medley relay but swam in the finals to help the U.S. win gold and set a new world record with a time of 3:26.78.

Apple did not swim in the heat of the 4x200-meter freestyle relay, but he did swim in the finals. The U.S. finished fourth, behind Great Britain, ROC, and Australia, with a time of 7:02.43. 

Apple also swam in the 100-meter freestyle, finishing third in his heat with a time of 48.16 seconds to advance to the semifinals. He came up 0.22 seconds short of advancing to the finals, with a time of 48.04 seconds.

Blake Pieroni — Swimming 

Credit: AP/Martin Meissner
United States men's 4x100m freestyle relay team, from left to right, Caeleb Dressel, Blake Pieroni, Bowen Becker, and Zach Apple, celebrate with their medals after winning the gold medal at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Monday, July 26, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan.

Chesterton native and IU graduate Blake Pieroni swam in three events at the Tokyo Olympics.

Pieroni swam in both the heat and finals of the 4x100-meter freestyle relay to help Team USA win the gold medal with a time in the finals of 3:08.97.

Pieroni swam in the qualifying heat of the 4x100-meter medley relay to help the U.S. advance to the finals with a time of 3:32.29. Team USA won gold and set a new world record with a time of 3:26.78. Although he did not swim in the finals, Pieroni won a gold medal for the event since he helped the team advance to the finals in the heat.

Pieroni helped Team USA advance to the finals of the men's 4x200-meter freestyle relay with a time of 7:05.62 in the heat; however, he did not swim in the finals, and the U.S. finished fourth, behind Great Britain, ROC, and Australia, with a time of 7:02.43.

Lilly King — Swimming

Credit: AP/Matthias Schrader
Lilly King of the United States poses with her bronze medal after the final of the women's 100-meter breaststroke at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 27, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan.

Two-time Olympic gold medalist Lilly King, an Evansville native who graduated from IU, medaled in all three of her events in Tokyo.

In the women's 100-meter breaststroke, King easily advanced to the finals by winning her heat and finishing second in her semifinal. She would go on to win the bronze medal with a time of 1:05.54, finishing behind 17-year-old teammate Lydia Jacoby, from Alaska, and Tatjana Schoenmaker, of South Africa.

Then, King competed in the women's 4x200-meter breaststroke event. After finishing first in her heat and second in her semifinal, King won the silver medal with a time of 2:19.92, only behind Schoenmaker, of South Africa.

King swam in the heats of the 4x100-meter medley relay to help the U.S. advance to the finals with a time of 3:55.18. She did not swim in the finals, as Team USA won silver, falling a little over a 10th of a second behind the Australian team, which took gold in the event. King was still awarded a silver medal in the event due to her participation in the heat.

In 2016, King won gold medals at the Rio Olympics in the 100-meter breaststroke and 4x100-meter medley.

Annie Lazor — Swimming

Credit: AP/Gregory Bull
From left, Lilly King, of United States, Tatjana Schoenmaker, of South Africa, and Annie Lazor, of United States, pose at the podium after the women's 200-meter breaststroke final at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Friday, July 30, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan.

Annie Lazor, who trains at IU, won bronze in the women's 200-meter breaststroke event.

After finishing second her heat and third in her semifinals, Lazor finished third in the finals with a time of 2:20,84, which was less than one second behind her teammate and IU graduate Lilly King.

Lynna Irby — Track and Field

Credit: AP/Francisco Seco
Lynna Irby of the United States after anchoring her team to win a semifinal of the women's 4 x 400-meter relay at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Thursday, Aug. 5, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan.

Merrillville native and Pike High School graduate Lynna Irby ran in two relay events in her first Olympics.

Team USA won its seventh consecutive gold medal in the women's 4x400-meter relay with a time of 3:16.85. Although she did not run in the finals, Irby helped the U.S. advance to the finals by finishing first in the second qualifying heat. Irby ran her leg in 50.34 seconds.

Credit: AP/Petr David Josek
Lynna Irby of the United States wipes a tear away after Team USA's initial disqualification in the 4 x 400-meter mixed relay at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Friday, July 30, 2021, in Tokyo.

Irby ran in the first qualifying heat of the inaugural 4x400-meter mixed relay event, but the team was disqualified immediately after the race because Irby was lined up outside the handoff area where she was supposed to take the baton from teammate Elija Godwin.

However, they were reinstated after Olympic officials determined that a race official had placed Irby in the wrong spot — and so it wasn't hers or the team's fault.

The U.S. team won bronze with a time of 3:10.22, finishing behind Poland and the Dominican Republic. Irby did not race in the finals but still earned a medal for helping the U.S. get to the finals.

Cole Hocker — Track and Field

Credit: AP Photo/Chris Carlson
Cole Hocker celebrates after winning the final in the men's 1500-meter run at the U.S. Olympic Track and Field Trials Sunday, June 27, 2021, in Eugene, Ore.

Cole Hocker, a Cathedral High School graduate who runs for the University of Oregon, competed in the men's 1,500 meters in Tokyo.

Hocker finished fourth in the first heat and second in his semifinal to advance to the finals. 

Hocker finished sixth in the finals with a time of 3:31.40, which is his personal best. Jakob Ingebrigtsen, of Norway, won gold and set an Olympic record with a time of 3:28.32. 

Kara Winger — Track and Field

Credit: AP/Matthias Schrader
Kara Winger, of United States, competes in qualifications for the women's javelin throw at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, Aug. 3, 2021, in Tokyo.

Purdue University graduate Kara Winger competed in her fourth Olympic Games in the women's javelin throw.

Winger threw 59.71 meters in her best throw in the qualifying round, good for eighth in her group. She ultimately finished 18th and did not advance to the finals. 

The four-time Olympian was chosen as Team USA's flag bearer in the Closing Ceremony.

Yared Nuguse— Track and Field

Credit: AP Photo/Thomas Boyd
Runners compete in a semifinal of the men's 1,500 meters during the NCAA Division I Outdoor Track and Field Championships, Wednesday, June 9, 2021, at Hayward Field in Eugene, Ore. Among the runners are Notre Dame's Yared Nuguse, middle, and Mississippi's Mario Garcia Romo, left.

University of Notre Dame graduate Yared Nuguse was supposed to run in the men's 1,500 meters, but an injury kept him from competing in Tokyo. 

USA Track & Field said Nuguse tried to warm up through an injury to his right thigh but was unable to run in his qualifying heat.

Rachel Dincoff — Track and Field

Credit: AP/Matthias Schrader
Rachel Dincoff, of United States, competes during the qualification round of the women's discus throw at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Saturday, July 31, 2021, in Tokyo.

Rachel Dincoff, of Waterloo, Indiana, competed in her first Olympics in the women's discus throw event.

Dincoff's top throw, 56.22 meters, was 11th in her qualification heat but was not good enough to advance her to the finals.

Molly Seidel — Track and Field

Credit: AP/Shuji Kajiyama
Molly Seidel, of United States, stands on the podium for a flower ceremony following her third place finish in the women's marathon at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Saturday, Aug. 7, 2021, in Sapporo, Japan.

University of Notre Dame graduate Molly Seidel won a bronze medal in her first Olympics in the women's marathon event.

Seidel led the pack through much of the middle stages of the race, before a pair of Kenyan runners opened a gap. Seidel held steady and finished third in 2:27:46 in what was just her third marathon ever.

She is the third American woman to medal in the Olympics marathon. 

Sarah Hildebrandt — Wrestling 

Credit: AP
United States' Saran Ann Hildebrandt stands on the podium with her bronze medal during the victory ceremony for women's freestyle 50kg wrestling at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Saturday, Aug. 7, 2021, in Chiba, Japan. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)

Granger native Sarah Hildebrandt competed in her first Olympics in freestyle wrestling in the 50-kilogram weight class as Team USA's lone representative in the 16-person event.

After winning her first two matches, Hildebrant lost in the semifinals to Yanan Sun, of China.

RELATED: What is 'repechage' at the Olympics?

Then, Hildebrandt won a bronze medal after beating Oksana Livach, of Ukraine, 12-1. There are two bronze medal winners in individual wrestling events, with Mariya Stadnik, of Azerbaijan, winning the other. 

Kayla Miracle — Wrestling

Credit: AP/Kyusung Gong
United States' Kayla Colleen Kiyoko Miracle competes during the women's 62kg freestyle wrestling match at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, Aug. 3, 2021, in Chiba, Japan.

Culver native Kayla Miracle competed in her first Olympics in freestyle wrestling in the 62-kilogram weight class.

Miracle lost on points, 3-2, to Long Jia, of China, in the opening round.

Joe Schroeder — Rugby

Credit: AP/Shuji Kajiyama
Joe Schroeder of the United States, center, celebrates scoring a try against South Africa, as he walks with teammate Steve Tomasin of the United States in their men's rugby sevens match at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 27, 2021 in Tokyo, Japan.

Joe Schroeder, a Cathedral High School graduate from Westfield, was part of the U.S. men's rugby team.

Team USA finished sixth at the Tokyo Olympics following a 28-7 loss during their match against South Africa. This is the team's highest-ever finish in an Olympic Games after previously finishing ninth in Rio in 2016.

The U.S. defeated Kenya and Ireland, but lost to South Africa, in Pool C. Then, Team USA lost to Great Britain in the quarterfinals but defeated Canada to face South Africa for the second time in Tokyo.

Alec Yoder — Gymnastics

Credit: AP/Ashley Landis
Alec Yoder of the United States, performs on the pommel horse during the artistic gymnastics men's apparatus final at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Sunday, Aug. 1, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan.

Indianapolis native Alec Yoder competed in the men's pommel horse in his first Olympic Games.

Yoder qualified for the medal round of the pommel horse with a score of 15.200 during qualifications.

In the final, Yoder posted a score lower than his qualifying performance — 14.566 — good for sixth place in the final standings. Max Whitlock, of Great Britain, defended his Olympic title with the top score of 15.583 points.

Rajeev Ram — Tennis

Credit: AP/Seth Wenig
United States mixed doubles team of Bethanie Mattek-Sands, right, and Rajeev Ram play a German team during the first round of the tennis competition at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Wednesday, July 28, 2021, in Tokyo, Japan.

Carmel High School graduate Rajeev Ram was competing in his second Olympics.

Ram and Frances Tiafoe won their first match against Karen Khachanov and Andrey Rublev, of ROC, 6-7, 7-6, 12-10 in men's doubles before losing their second-round match 6-3, 7-5 to Marin Cilic and Ivan Dodig, of Croatia, who won the silver medal.

Ram and Bethanie Mattek-Sands lost their first-round match in mixed doubles to Kevin Krawietz and Laura Siegemund, of Germany, 6-4, 5-7, 10-8.

Ram won a silver medal at the 2016 Rio Games in mixed doubles alongside Venus Williams.

Lee Kiefer — Fencing

Credit: AP/Hassan Ammar
Gold medalist Lee Kiefer of the United States, holds her gold medal during the medal ceremony for the women's individual Foil final competition at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Sunday, July 25, 2021, in Chiba, Japan.

University of Notre Dame graduate Lee Kiefer won her first gold medal in Tokyo in her third Olympic Games.

Kiefer defeated Amita Berthier, of Singapore, Eleanor Harvey, of Canda, Yuka Ueno, of Japan, and Larisa Korobeynikova, of ROC, to advance to the gold medal match of women's foil individual, where she defeated Inna Deriglazova, of ROC, 15-13, to win the event.

The U.S. beat Japan in the quarterfinals of the women's foil team event, but lost to ROC in the semifinals and Italy in the bronze medal match.

Nick Itkin — Fencing

Credit: AP/Andrew Medichini
Nik Itkin of the United States celebrates after defeating Anton Borodachev of the Russian Olympic Committee in the men's individual round of 32 Foil competition at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Monday, July 26, 2021, in Chiba, Japan.

Nick Itkin, a current student at the University of Notre Dame, competed in his first Olympics.

Itkin was part of Team USA's men's foil team, alongside University of Notre Dame graduate Gerek Meinhardt. The U.S. defeated Germany in the quarterfinals before losing to ROC in the quarterfinals. Itkin and Team USA then won the bronze medal against Japan, 45-31.

Itkin placed 12th in the individual men's foil fencing event after beating Anton Borodachev, of ROC, 15-11, in the first round before losing to Kirill Borodachev, of ROC, 15-13, in the second round.

Gerek Meinhardt — Fencing

Credit: AP/Hassan Ammar
Gerek Meinhardt of the Unites States celebrates winning a point as competes Vladislav Mylnikov of the Russian Olympic Committee in the men's Foil team semifinal competition at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Sunday, Aug. 1, 2021, in Chiba, Japan.

University of Notre Dame graduate Gerek Meinhardt competed in his fourth Olympics in Tokyo.

Meinhardt was part of Team USA's men's foil team, alongside current University of Notre Dame student Nick Itkin. The U.S. defeated Germany in the quarterfinals before losing to ROC in the quarterfinals. Meinhardt and Team USA then won the bronze medal against Japan, 45-31.

Meinhardt finished 17th in the men's foil individual, losing to Vladislav Mylnikov, of ROC, 15-11.

Meinhardt also won a bronze medal at the 2016 Rio Games in the foil team event.

Mariel Zagunis — Fencing

Credit: AP/Andrew Medichini
Mariel Zagunis of the United States celebrates after defeating Kim Jiyeon of South Korea in the women's individual round of 16 Sabre competition at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Monday, July 26, 2021, in Chiba, Japan.

University of Notre Dame graduate Mariel Zagunis competed in her fifth Olympic Games in Tokyo.

Zagunis placed fifth in the women's foil individual, losing to Sofya Velikaya, of ROC, 15-8, in the quarterfinals. She beat Gabriella Page, of Canada, and Jiyeon Kim, of the Republic of Korea, in the first two rounds.

The U.S. lost to France in the quarterfinals of the women's sabre team event, but later beat China to reach the fifth-sixth place match against Japan. The U.S. lost to the Japanese, finishing sixth in the competition.

Zagunis won gold medals in individual in 2004 (Athens) and 2008 (Beijing), as well as bronze medals in team in 2008 (Beijing) and 2016 (Rio).

Courtney Hurley — Fencing

Credit: AP/Andrew Medichini
Song Sera of South Korea, left, and Courtney Hurley of the United States compete in the Women's Epee team quarterfinal competition at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Tuesday, July 27, 2021, in Chiba, Japan.

University of Notre Dame graduate Courtney Hurley competed in her third Olympic Games.

Hurley lost to Mingye Zhu, of China, 15-8, in the Round of 32 in the women's épée individual. 

Hurley, alongside her sister, Kelley, and the women's épée team finished fifth after losing to the Republic of Korea in the quarterfinals, and then beating Hong Kong and Poland.

Hurley previously won a bronze medal in 2012 at the London Olympics in the women's épée team event.

Kelley Hurley — Fencing

Credit: AP/Andrew Medichini
Kelley Hurley of the United States, left, and Erika Kirpu of Estonia compete in the women's individual Epee round of 32 competition at the 2020 Summer Olympics, Saturday, July 24, 2021, in Chiba, Japan.

University of Notre Dame graduate Kelley Hurley competed in her fourth Olympic Games.

Hurley beat Erika Kirpu, of Estonia, 15-14, in the Round of 32 in the women's épée individual. She lost to Aizanat Murtazaeva, of Russia, in the Round of 16 in a 12-11 decision in overtime and finished 12th.

Hurley, alongside her sister, Courtney, and the women's épée team finished fifth after losing to the Republic of Korea in the quarterfinals, and then beating Hong Kong and Poland.

Hurley previously won a bronze medal in 2012 at the London Olympics in the women's épée team event.

Sabrina Massialas — Fencing

Credit: USA Fencing
Sabrina Massialas

University of Notre Dame graduate Sabrina Massialas was the reserve member for the U.S. women's foil team. 

The U.S. beat Japan in the quarterfinals of the women's foil team event but lost to ROC in the semifinals and Italy in the bronze medal match.

Francesca Russo — Fencing

Credit: Notre Dame Athletics
Francesa Russo

University of Notre Dame graduate Francesca Russo was the reserve member for the U.S. women's sabre team.

The U.S. lost to France in the quarterfinals of the women's sabre team event but later beat China to reach the fifth-sixth place match against Japan. The U.S. lost to the Japanese, finishing sixth in the competition.