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13 WTHR Indianapolis | Indianapolis Local News & Weather

New messages encourage Hoosiers to participate in COVID-19 registry

Researchers say they need more relevant information about the spread and impact of the virus among Hoosiers.

NOTRE DAME, Ind. — As new and more transmissible forms of the novel coronavirus spread in Indiana and the state's vaccine rollout continues to expand, researchers say they need more relevant information about the spread and impact of the virus among Hoosiers.

The Indiana COVID-19 Registry has been tracking and updating pandemic data from Indiana since last summer in an effort to measure impacts of the virus, anticipate health care needs and foster better understanding of how the state is dealing with the virus.

As of Friday, 460 volunteers have registered and participated in the survey.

Now, Hoosiers may be seeing new public service announcements for television, radio and digital media that have been created to encourage more participation in the registry.

The registry consists of a short introductory survey and periodic follow-up surveys in English and Spanish.

Researchers at Notre Dame, Indiana and Purdue universities partnered with the Indiana Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute and All IN for Health to track volunteers 18 and older in the registry. Data from the registry is stored in a highly secure system built and maintained by the Center for Research Computing at Notre Dame. Register here.

Registry background

Marie Lynn Miranda, provost at Notre Dame, in one of the leaders of the project and has a background in documenting environmental, health and economic impacts since Hurricane Harvey struck the Houston area while she was working at Rice University in 2017.

When the pandemic began, local health departments asked Miranda's team to build an Indiana COVID-19 registry modeled on the Texas Flood Registry from Harvey.

The Indiana COVID-19 registry consists of a short introductory survey and periodic follow-up surveys in English and Spanish. Data from the registry is stored in a highly secure system built and maintained by the Center for Research Computing at Notre Dame.