Will Power wins 3rd Indy Grand Prix title

Will Power, of Australia, celebrates after winning the pole for the IndyCar Grand Prix auto race at Indianapolis Motor Speedway in Indianapolis, Friday, May 11, 2018. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
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SPEEDWAY, Ind. (WTHR) - Will Power won the Indy Grand Prix Saturday afternoon.

This is the third time Power took home the title in the race's five-year history.

There were concerns toward the end of the race that rain may become a factor, but there was never any lightning and the rain stayed to a minimum for the final laps.

Watch Eyewitness News Nightbeat at 11 p.m. for highlights.

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Below is a live blog as it was updated throughout the race.

5:26 p.m.


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5:25 p.m.


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5:23 p.m.


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4:45 p.m.

Rookie Robert Wickens assumed the lead on Lap 26 as drivers cycled through the first round of pit stops at the IndyCar Grand Prix and led pole winner Will Power by 1.6841 seconds through 46 laps of the 85-lap race.

Power, of Australia, has won the race twice — both from the pole.

Team Penske has won all four previous races on the 2.439-mile, 14-turn course — a streak that could be in serious jeopardy.

Wickens, of Canada, drives for Schmidt Peterson Motorsports.

American Graham Rahal was third, more than 2.6 seconds off the pace.

A record-tying seven different drivers have led the race. The previous mark was set in the inaugural 2014 grand prix.

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4:16 p.m.


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4 p.m.

Pace car driver Lilly King, a two-time Olympic gold medalist, and pole winner Will Power led the 24-car field to the starting line.

Power took the lead into the first turn but it didn't take long for the caution flag to come out.

Race organizers reviewed two first lap incidents that sent four cars off the 2.439-mile, 14-turn course.

They assessed no penalties for contact between two-time race winner Simon Pagenaud and rookie Jordan King. But they did assess a drive-thru penalty to Spencer Pigot for avoidable contact after drove over the chicane in the sixth turn and ran into Indy 500 champion Takuma Sato.

There were no cautions in last year's race.

Pole winners have won each of the last three races on Indianapolis' road course - with Power taking two of those three.

--Associated Press

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3:36 p.m.


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2:21 p.m.


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2 p.m.

Marco Andretti's engine has been replaced, and he is expected to start from the 14th spot in Saturday's race.

Andretti blew an engine in the morning warmup session and almost immediately, one crew member from each of Andretti Autosport's four teams headed straight to the garage to make the change.

Roughly two hours later, they were ready to fire up the car with a new Honda engine.

Andretti's car will not be penalized for making the change.

It's the only car in the first two days of the month to have an engine problem.

--Associated Press

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1:37 p.m. - Indiana swimmers have a saying, "All great racers come to Indy." Olympic gold medalist breast stroker Lilly King is driving the Corvette pace car for today's race.


12:30 p.m. - On-track action started in the morning, with drivers taking a few final practice runs around the road course.




Fans started showing up around 7:30 a.m. to check out new rides and attractions at the midway, like the karting track. The folks at Sarah Fisher’s place, SI Karting on Speedway’s Main Street, set up the course. It costs $5 to ride for 3 minutes and several people we talked with told us they loved the fast-paced action inside IMS.

“It's been smooth running,” said track marshal Colby Theobald. “This is as close as you can get to actually racing here at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway if you're not actually one of the drivers, so it's a ton of fun.”


If you’re out at IMS this weekend, you may also notice a couple safety robots. One of them is called ROSS-E, named after Indianapolis 500 champion, Alexander Rossi. Its main purpose is surveillance.

“He actually has omni-directional wheels on the back that allow it to pivot on an axis and all terrain wheels on the front, so they can handle any kind of terrain at the track,” said security guard Grant Phillips.

Unlike some of the other vehicles at the track, ROSS-E is not much of a racing robot. His top speed is only about 3 miles per hour.

The INDYCAR Grand Prix starts at 3:50 p.m. You can also watch the highlights on WTHR on Saturday night at 11 p.m. --Anna Carrera