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Dry summer causing home foundation problems in central Indiana

Experts say when it comes to checking your home, look for cracks along the outside of your home, especially brick homes, as well as shifting of floors.

GREENWOOD, Ind. — We have all felt the effects of the heat this summer in one way or another, and now it's impacting the foundations of Hoosier homes. Experts said this happens when soil expands and then dries up, causing cracks in homes. 

Experts with Indiana Foundation Service in Greenwood said 30 of their calls this summer have been for foundation settlements cracking, which is the complete opposite from what they saw last year, when there was more rain.

Experts say when it comes to checking your home, look for cracks along the outside of your home, especially brick homes, as well as shifting of floors.

"Doors are sticking, you've got cracks above your doorways. Gaps in the windows, you take a walk outside and you see caulk joints that look stretched or a gap there where there used to not be," said Aaron Ewert with Indiana Home Foundation. "Maybe a window doesn't open like it used to. Typically, that is a sign of a foundation settlement that should be addressed sooner rather than later."

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While there isn't much to do to prevent lack of rain, Ewert said there are a few things you can do to try and help.

"Homeowners can get their downspouts away from the house. Make sure their gutters are clean, things like that. We see lots of just simple maintenance issues that lead to big issues with their foundation," Ewert said. "Most of the time could have been prevented a long time ago, had they maintained some of those things."

The latest Live Doppler 13 drought weather model highlights parts of northern central Indiana as being dryer than others. Those areas include Lafayette, Kokomo and northern Indianapolis. 

Credit: WTHR

RELATED: Citizens Energy uses backup reservoir to fill crucial bodies of water as drought persists in central Indiana

Studies show Indiana's summer drought is projected to get worse over the next decade, so experts recommend keeping an eye for those cracks and unleveled floors and give them a call sooner rather than later. That will save you money in the long haul. 

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