x
Breaking News
More () »

GetGo recalls apple slices with peanut butter due to potential salmonella contamination

The product was sold through May 13 and can be identified by the UPC 30034 93770 6 and includes best if used by dates through May 29, 2022.

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Giant Eagle has issued a recall of GetGo branded apples with peanut butter dip sold in GetGo stations across several states, including Indiana, due to potential salmonella contamination.

The recall stems from the nationwide Jif brand peanut butter recall from the J.M. Smucker company.

The peanut butter included in the recalled GetGo apples with peanut butter dip is included in the Jif peanut butter recall.

The product was sold through May 13 and can be identified by the UPC 30034 93770 6 and includes best if used by dates through May 29, 2022.

Those who purchased the affected product should throw it away or return it to GetGo for a refund.

The recalled product was sold in about 215 transactions, according to the grocery chain.

There have not been any reports of illnesses, according to the company.

Guests with questions may call Giant Eagle and GetGo Customer Care at 1-800-553- 2324.

About the Jif recall

On Saturday, May 21, 2022, J.M. Smucker issued a voluntary recall for dozens of products covering a wide range of sizes with lot code numbers between 1274425 – 2140425. The recalled peanut butter varieties include creamy, crunchy, natural honey, reduced fat creamy and many others. A full list of the recalled items can be found on Jif's website. 

According to the Food and Drug Administration, the recalled peanut butter was distributed nationwide in retail stores and other outlets. 

What is salmonella?

Salmonella can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people and others with weakened immune systems, according to the FDA. Healthy people infected with salmonella often experience fever, diarrhea (which may be bloody), nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain.

The CDC estimates that the bacteria causes about 1.35 million infections, 26,500 hospitalizations, and 420 deaths in the U.S. every year.

Paid Advertisement