Kravitz Dopey Report Card: Colts at Titans (Oct. 16, 2017)

Tennessee Titans inside linebacker Avery Williamson (54) forces a fumble by Indianapolis Colts tight end Jack Doyle (84) in the second half of an NFL football game Monday, Oct. 16, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Zaleski)
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Bob Kravitz

INDIANAPOLIS (WTHR) - Every week, Bob Kravitz offers his Dopey Report Card on the Indianapolis Colts' performance. This week, he breaks down the Colts' road loss to Tennessee on Monday Night Football.

RUN OFFENSE: C-plus

You want to talk dopey? A week ago, Marlon Mack had a breakout performance against the San Francisco 49ers. This week, he ran the ball twice and had two passes thrown in his direction, both of which were incomplete. That is coaching negligence of the highest order. For a half, the Colts ran exceedingly well, 67 yards on 11 carries and Frank Gore was rolling, but in the second half, just nine times for 18 yards. If you can understand how a team can be so effective running the ball in one half and so utterly ineffectual in the other half, you're a lot smarter than me.

RUN DEFENSE: B

I know, it sounds crazy to give this group a B when they surrender 168 rushing yards and a 4.9 yards-per-attempt average. But for 55 minutes, the Colts run defense, led again by Johnathan Hankins and Al Woods, were terrific. Take out Derrick Henry's game-icing 72-yard run late in the game, and the Colts gave up just 96 yards on 34 carries. I realize, you can't take that 72-yarder out of the equation, but that was a point in the game when the Colts were selling out on the run and attempting to strip the ball carrier. So it's not completely unusual when a runner pops a long one. The Colts allowed just 27 yards on the Titans' 14 first-down rush attempts.

Indianapolis Colts quarterback Jacoby Brissett (7) passes against the Tennessee Titans in the first half of an NFL football game Monday, Oct. 16, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/James Kenney)
Indianapolis Colts quarterback Jacoby Brissett (7) passes against the Tennessee Titans in the first half of an NFL football game Monday, Oct. 16, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/James Kenney)

PASS OFFENSE: C

The good news is, Jacoby Brissett did not get sacked a single time and was pressured just seven times, and that's with the O-line in flux once again. Very quietly, Anthony Castonzo is having a nice bounceback season. Brissett? Just OK. Terrific in the first half, ordinary or worse in the second half. The real issue was the receiving corps. T.Y. Hilton was targeted just four times and made one catch. In the Colts' four losses, Hilton has averaged three catches on five targets, according to Pro Football Focus. Jack Doyle had another nightmare game with two drops and a lost fumble. Donte Moncrief, who had five catches for 67 yards, dropped an early, would-be touchdown pass. This is a team with very little margin for error, but still finds a way to beat itself more often than not.

PASS DEFENSE: C

Marcus Mariota played on one leg, didn't even try to move around and still threw for 306 yards as a pure pocket passer. The Colts only pressured him nine times and sacked him once, but even when they pressured him, Mariota carved them up. That fourth-quarter go-ahead bomb to Taywan Taylor? A complete breakdown in the secondary, although Pagano would not specifically point the finger at either Pierre Desir or Malik Hooker. (I know Quincy Wilson doesn't play special teams, but I'd really rather see him out there than Desir). The one defensive standout for the Colts was linebacker John Simon, who had an amazing pick-six, a sack, a pair of QB hits, five solo tackles and two run stops, according to Pro Football Focus.

SPECIAL TEAMS: B

Except for an early 40-yard kickoff return by Tennessee's electric returner, Adoree Jackson, the Colts dominated. Quan Bray had five kick returns for 157 yards, a 31.4 yards-per-return average. (I prefer when Bray runs the football rather than attempting to throw it). Rigoberto Sanchez had another solid game, as has been the case virtually all season. The only demerit? Adam Vinatieri's missed PAT, his second of this young season. He made a 52-yarder and missed a PAT; go figure.

COACHING: D

Tennessee Titans inside linebacker Wesley Woodyard (59) knocks Indianapolis Colts quarterback Jacoby Brissett (7) out of bounds to stop a Colts' drive late in the fourth quarter. (AP Photo/Mark Zaleski)
Tennessee Titans inside linebacker Wesley Woodyard (59) knocks Indianapolis Colts quarterback Jacoby Brissett (7) out of bounds to stop a Colts' drive late in the fourth quarter. (AP Photo/Mark Zaleski)

Let me get this out of the way first: I had no problem with the fourth and one call at the Tennessee 13-yard line. The way Tennessee's defenders were crashing down, there was every reason to believe Brissett would have plenty of real estate on a bootleg. It just so happened that their player, Wesley Woodyard, made a terrific, athletic play and ran down Brissett short of the first-down marker. That said, I took major issue with the way Rob Chudzinski made Mack disappear; even Pagano acknowledged after the game they've got to get Mack more touches. And somebody needs to explain to me why Pagano did not call a timeout before the two-minute warning. As it turned out, it didn't matter once Henry broke loose for a 72-yard TD run, but that made no sense.

INTANGIBLES: C-minus

If you think about it, the only thing the Titans did Monday was wait around for the Colts to self destruct. It's not like Tennessee played a great game or anything; they just hung around and hung around and waited for the Colts to implode – which they inevitably do. Right now, this is not a well-coached team that also happens to lack talent. Put that combination together, you get 2-4. I've said it before and I'll say it again: Andrew Luck can't save this group. He can and will help, but he can't save them.