HIV diagnosis rate fell by third in US over decade - 13 WTHR Indianapolis

HIV diagnosis rate fell by third in US over decade

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NEW YORK - A new study says the rate of HIV infections diagnosed in the United States each year fell by one-third over the past decade.
    
Experts said it's hopeful news that the AIDS epidemic may be slowing in the U.S.
    
The reasons for the drop aren't clear. It might mean fewer new infections are occurring, or most infected people already were diagnosed.
    
The study was released online Saturday by the Journal of the American Medical Association.
    
HIV is the virus that causes AIDS.
    
From 2002 to 2011, the study found the rate dropped from 24 to 16 out of every 100,000 people ages 13 and older.

Meanwhile, the U.N. AIDS agency says the number of people living with HIV worldwide has remained virtually unchanged in the past two years and AIDS-related deaths are at their lowest since peaking almost a decade ago.

Officials declared that ending the AIDS epidemic is possible even though they acknowledge the number of new infections - more than 2 million last year - was still very high. UNAIDS estimated there were about 35 million people living with HIV last year and in 2012.
   
In its report Wednesday, the agency also set targets to reduce deaths and new cases by 90 percent by 2030. It previously unveiled a strategy to get to "zero AIDS-related deaths," which included ensuring all people who need treatment are on it by 2015.

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