IMPD officers killed in murder-suicide had history of problems - 13 WTHR Indianapolis

IMPD officers killed in murder-suicide had history of marriage problems

Updated:
IMPD Chief Rick Hite IMPD Chief Rick Hite
Friends console each other after hearing the tragic news. Friends console each other after hearing the tragic news.
INDIANAPOLIS -

Eyewitness News is learning new details on the murder-suicide involving two Indianapolis Metro Police officers Thursday.

IMPD Sgt. Ryan Anders shot and killed his ex-wife before turning the gun on himself. The woman who died was Officer Kimberlee Carmack, a 20-year veteran with IMPD who filed for divorce last year and had a protective order.

Detectives say Sgt. Anders broke into his ex-wife's home on Inishmore Court, disabled the security system and opened fire. By the time, the SWAT team got there, both officers were dead.

At a news conference Friday morning, IMPD Chief Rick Hite outlined the couple's troubled relationship that spilled over to their police jobs. Both officers were on administrative leave because of their behavior surrounding their troubled relationship.

Their supervisors had already ordered both officers to surrender their police-issued items like their service weapons. Also, IMPD was working to keep both Anders and Carmack away from each other as much as possible. That included some of their previous assignments so they would not cross paths.

The department is helping fellow officers deal with this unexpected tragedy involving very well-liked two officers.

"She's a 21-year veteran and she was a civilian before she became a sworn police officer and just one of the calmest, soft-spoken, nicest people that you'd met. Always smiling. And the same with Ryan. Ryan was just, again, a soft-spoken, kind of a jokester kind of a guy. And they had an awful lot of friends," said Bill Owensby, Fraternal Order of Police president.

Carmack was staying at a safe place, the chief said, but she returned to her house - against the advisement of police. The chief said both Carmack and Anders had received counseling for their marital problems.

In an effort to keep both Carmack and Anders say, IMPD monitored their whereabouts with check-ins starting in mid-February.

By March 29th, a judge granted a protective order to Carmack. Police supervisors even advised her to live away from their west side home.

"We looked at the allegations on both sides. There were issues that we know for a fact that were challenging for us as an agency or anyplace, workplace, where people have back-and-forth issues, oftentimes in domestic situations there are honeymoon periods where they're back together; they break up. And allegations on both sides of the equation. So our job is to make sure we don't take sides but look at what is the best interest in the safety of the person. In this case, relieve them of their weapons and make sure there's a place for him to go and a safe place for her to go," said IMPD Chief Hite.

On April 1st, police collaborated with prosecutors about the couple as both were placed on administrative leave. But the troubled relationship came to a tragic end after police say Anders forced his way in the home they once shared, armed with a gun and intent.

"Multiple shots were fired at her, killing her, then turning the gun on himself," said Chief Hite.

Now both families and police will have to start the sad task of funeral plans for the officers.

"This is tough work and it takes its toll on you. It really does," said the chief.

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