Indianapolis Super Bowl Committee prepares to tweak bid - 13 WTHR Indianapolis

Indianapolis Super Bowl Committee prepares to tweak bid

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Members of the city's Super Bowl committee toured New York's setup this week. Members of the city's Super Bowl committee toured New York's setup this week.
The committee plans to tweak their bid, based on what they saw in New York. The committee plans to tweak their bid, based on what they saw in New York.
Part of the changes involve the use of Georgia Street as a Super Bowl village. Part of the changes involve the use of Georgia Street as a Super Bowl village.
Indianapolis set records at the interactive NFL Experience in 2012. Indianapolis set records at the interactive NFL Experience in 2012.
INDIANAPOLIS -

Winter weather is just one concern for the group leading the Indianapolis bid for the Super Bowl in 2018.

The group is back from New York with more on the takeaways from this weekend that could strengthen Indy's proposal.

New York City took a small Indiana idea and did it up big! You could say "Super Bowl Boulevard" was Georgia Street on steroids, including monster social media screens.

"They went 13 blocks down and they pretty much designated each block for a different activity," said Susan Baughman, vice president of the Indiana Sports Corporation and committee member.

The Indianapolis committee took pride in the fact that its concept built along Georgia Street was being played out on one of the biggest stages in New York city at Times Square.

Now it's back to work, tweaking its secret proposal based on what went well and what didn't.
One of the biggest takeaways: the NFL wants more space.

"We have intentions on expanding the scope of our village. So providing more space in our footprint, activities in different areas that would draw the crowds and continue to move the timing of those activities," explained Baughman who said the NFL also has more media staging.

For a cold-climate city, weather was a non-issue in New York, while all across the country, winter storms created some of the worst conditions in decade, including here in Indianapolis.

Yet the committee doesn't believe it's facing a weakened position. The NFL works on weather averages over several years.

"New Orleans, ironically, is the coldest Super Bowl on record thus far, so when you think about that, weather has just been a problem nationally," said Rafael Sanchez, an Indianapolis attorney on the committee.

From one cold weather city looking in on another, the indoor interactive NFL Experience was overlooked by New York. In 2012, Indianapolis set records with 365,000 people participating.

"We missed the indoor fan experience and wish to see that if we should get the bid again," said Baughman.

The team will adopt some ideas, while playing up Indy's strengths as a city that created some permanent footprints for the NFL.

The committee says its preliminary bid is due April 1.

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