Dog shot in possible gang initiation activity in Indianapolis - 13 WTHR Indianapolis

Dog shot in possible gang initiation activity in Indianapolis

Updated:
The dog was rescued by Indianapolis Metro Police officers in the 1400 block of Marlow Avenue Saturday night. The dog was rescued by Indianapolis Metro Police officers in the 1400 block of Marlow Avenue Saturday night.
Local dog rescue organization Every Dog Counts got the pit bull puppy to an emergency veterinary clinic that saved the animal's life. Local dog rescue organization Every Dog Counts got the pit bull puppy to an emergency veterinary clinic that saved the animal's life.
Three days later, some of the same officers who came to the puppy's aide were reunited with her Tuesday afternoon. Three days later, some of the same officers who came to the puppy's aide were reunited with her Tuesday afternoon.
INDIANAPOLIS -

Police are investigating if a dog shot and left to die this past weekend was part of a gang initiation.

The dog was rescued by Indianapolis Metro Police officers in the 1400 block of Marlow Avenue Saturday night.

Local dog rescue organization Every Dog Counts got the pit bull puppy to an emergency veterinary clinic that saved the animal's life.

Three days later, some of the same officers who came to the puppy's aide were reunited with her Tuesday afternoon.

These officers carry guns, arrest criminals and put their lives on the line every day.

Seeing a five-month-old pit bull puppy, though, has brought out the softer side of the officers from IMPD's north east district.

"Hi Sweetie," one said to the dog, patting her on the head.

"Hello, sweet pea," another cooed to the puppy.

Some of these same officers are part of the reason the dog is alive and wagging her tail today.

"She's still happy like she was the day I met her," said IMPD Officer Jennifer Gabel.

For Officer Gabel, that day was this past Saturday when she and two other officers went to a call for a dog shot on the city's east side.

"She didn't look good when we got there," said Officer Richard Lavish.

"She was just sitting on the front porch bleeding heavily. Cold," remembered Officer Gabel.

"All the neighbors were holding her, holding the pressure on her trying to stop the bleeding," added Lavish.

"She would wag her tail still, even though she was in all that pain," said Gabel.

That pain came after police said someone shot the dog in the face, chest and tail.

"There's no way to justify it. There's a lot of bad things that happen in the world, but to do something to an innocent animal is not right," said Officer Lavish.

What is right, though, said police, was how many people stepped in to help.

"It's awesome to see that she made it through and that there's people that are going to pay for her to get fixed," said Officer Scott Bohan, speaking about the donations that have come in to Every Dog Counts to pay for multiple surgeries to rebuild the puppy's jaw that was destroyed by a bullet. Those surgeries will cost in the thousands.

Every Dog Counts has even given the puppy a name. They've called her Joy.

"The name alone speaks for itself. Like I said, it's amazing she's alive," said Officer Gabel.

Joy's got a lot of work ahead of her to heal. She'll have first surgery on Thursday.

The police also have a lot of work ahead of them to find out who shot her and why.

Police said they're investigating whether Joy was shot as part of a gang initiation.

"There have been a couple of other cases over the summer that may or may not be related," said Officer Theresa Redman.

Redman hopes someone will come forward about what happened with a tip for Crime Stoppers (317-262-TIPS).

"She's a beautiful dog. She doesn't deserve this," said Redman of Joy.

"She's a trooper," said Officer Lavish.

Every Dog Counts

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