December turning into a violent month - 13 WTHR Indianapolis

December turning into a violent month

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INDIANAPOLIS -

'Tis the season for crime and violence. Two more shootings this weekend left two people, including a 15-year-old boy, dead. But unfortunately, the violence doesn't surprise some. It's another deadly trend going in the wrong direction.

This weekend's violence started Friday night with the shooting of Michael Boyd, who was 23. It happened following a disturbance at a Shell gas station on the city's northeast side. After getting shot, police say Boyd ran and collapsed in a nearby yard where he died.

"We never got no problems here in this complex," said Carl Straughan

Straughan lives at the scene of another deadly shooting this weekend. This one happened at the Rosewood Commons Apartments on the city's northwest side. 15-year-old Anthony Warren was shot and killed under a tree Saturday shortly after noon.

Rev. Charles Harrison, leader of the Ten Point Coalition, says December is typically a violent month because even criminals are trying to collect money to provide Christmas for their families. He says now more than ever, peace is a necessity. It's a message he's not only preaching on the streets, but at his church.

"We celebrate the Prince of Peace this month as we lead to Christmas and we're talking how can we make this a peaceful city," said Rev. Harrison.

After an especially violent summer in the city, Rev. Harrison says he's not surprised it's continuing into an icy, cold December.

"Money, drugs and then street conflict. Those are the three biggest things that are driving the increase in violence," said Rev. Harrison.

Then comes retaliation, an element, Rev. Harrison says played a role in Friday night's shooting.

The murder of the 15-year-old continues one trend of more young people carrying guns. But, it builds on a newer trend regarding the location of the crime.

"Pike has been one of those areas we haven't had a lot of trouble in. But, because of the apartment complexes in the Pike area, we're now seeing an uptick in the Pike area," said Rev. Harrison.

In the end, Rev. Harrison says it's a problem that affects all of us.

"We have family members and relatives and neighbors that we know are involved in things that can lead to violence. We have to be more vocal and more engaged," said Rev. Harrison.

Turning a season of giving into a season of saving our community.

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