IMPD identifies suspect who died during drug arrest on east side - 13 WTHR Indianapolis

IMPD identifies suspect who died during drug arrest on east side

Updated:
Jeffrey Lilly Jeffrey Lilly
INDIANAPOLIS -

A suspect in an alleged drug deal died as he was being arrested Thursday evening. The man was identified as 22-year-old Jeffery B. Lilly Jr.

Police conducting an undercover narcotics investigation say a man was participating in a reported drug deal near E. 22nd and Station streets on the east side of Indianapolis when he saw an approaching officer. The man ran away from police as they attempted to arrest him, but tripped during the foot pursuit.

"Right now, we just know that he fell on his own, he struggled with officers as they were trying to make arrest, a TASER was used and the suspect swallowed some type of narcotic," said IMPD Ofc. Kendale Adams. "We don't know what that narcotic is. We don't know how many it was, that'll all be determined with the investigators."

Friends and family members of the man came to the scene and got belligerent. Police say someone damaged a police vehicle at the scene.

Extra police officers and ministers from the Ten Point Coalition were brought on scene to ease the tension.

Police say the suspect, later identified as Lilly, became unresponsive after he was taken into custody. EMS crews were called to the scene to assist the man, but he was pronounced deceased.

Late Friday, IMPD said Lilly sold two rocks of crack cocaine in a hand-to-hand buy to undercover officers. The transaction was audio and video recorded.

IMPD says the autopsy revealed there were no signs of injury to Lilly's body, indicating there were no blunt force injuries. There were some bruises as a result of the struggle with officers but none of the bruises were deep enough to cause serious injury or internal bleeding.

A baggie was recovered from the man's airway. The bag appeared to be punctured and empty of contents. IMPD says it is not uncommon for drug dealers to attempt to conceal drugs by placing them in their mouths and sometimes swallowing them.

The toxicology report will take about six weeks. The coroner will make a determination of the manner and cause of death once that report is in.

The officers are on paid administrative leave, which is standard department policy after these type of incidents.

 

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