High demand squeezes supply of IU basketball tickets - 13 WTHR Indianapolis

High demand squeezes supply of IU basketball tickets

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BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -

The law of supply and demand can be a bit problematic for people looking to buy Indiana University basketball tickets.

It is a problem most colleges across America would love to have. Putting it bluntly, IU has more students buying tickets than it has available seating. Head coach Tom Crean has brought back a winning tradition at Assembly Hall and even added hot pizza on those cold days when students have to camp out to get a seat.

Assembly Hall seats 17,472 fans and 7,800 of those comprise one of the largest student sections in the country - but here's the rub - IU has sold 14,500 student tickets, so clearly something has to give.

"They would rather have all of the students see some of the games as opposed to some of the students seeing all of the games," said JD Campbell in the IU athletic department.

So IU is implementing a new season ticket plan which allows ticket holders to see all the schools football games and eight of the basketball games. That is down from the 10-game package offered a year ago, but it may go down even more, if the school sells over 15,600 student tickets this year.

"It's kind of a bummer, because you don't get to experience all the games like a normal student would want to. There is not much you can really do about it except go along with it," said sophomore Jordan Worth.

"It was easy to buy tickets from other students because they couldn't go, so you could purchase another student's ticket. Now it's going to be even harder to get to a game if you don't have season tickets," said senior Michele Peneff.

Some were upset at the price, but IU says those students who bought the package through the bursar's office for $320 will only be charged $200.

"I'm graduating. I don't get to experience it, but I think it's real important to go to more games. More students need to go. Support your team, support your school," said senior Natalie Wulff.

That is the goal. While the idea may not be ideal, it is an ideal many other schools can only aspire to.

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