Purdue University aviation students learning from airliner crash - 13 WTHR Indianapolis

Purdue University aviation students learning from San Francisco jet crash

Updated:
Flying a Cirrus over West Lafayette, the flight instructor can't help but think about the crash landing of a Boeing 777 at San Francisco International. Flying a Cirrus over West Lafayette, the flight instructor can't help but think about the crash landing of a Boeing 777 at San Francisco International.
WEST LAFAYETTE -

While Saturday's crash-landing at San Francisco International claimed the lives of two Chinese teenagers, hundreds of other passengers miraculously survived and escaped the burning airplane.

Aviation students at Purdue University are already learning from this crash. Purdue aviation senior Jared Kuhn logged in-flight training hours with Eyewitness News' reporter Nicole Pence Monday.

Flying a Cirrus over West Lafayette, the flight instructor can't help but think about the crash landing of a Boeing 777 at San Francisco International.

"As pilots, we always are looking for what's happened in the past to try to prevent something in the future," said Kuhn.

Kuhn said take-off and landing are the busiest times for a pilot, including how low the plane should be on approach.

"Yes, San Francisco has the water, which makes the depth perception. We do practice this," he said.

Like professional pilots, the aviation students practice flying in and out of every airport in flight simulators.

Kuhn showed us what the landing approach looks like at San Francisco International: "The lights on indicate too high or too low."

Asiana Airlines flight 214 hit the sea wall just before it reached runway 28 Left.

"It looks like too low and slow. They had waited too long to get this engine accelerated," said aviation professor Mike Davis.

Purdue Aviation Professor Mike Davis stands in front of a turbo fan engine used on a 777.

Davis said he will use this crash to remind his students about engine reaction time because every plane is different.

"Even an engine this large can accelerate in 7-8 seconds. But, if it was too low or too slow, no. They didn't have it," said Davis.

A 777 holds more than 300 people.

The jetliner is not normally scheduled at Indianapolis International Airport, although Federal Express has 23 that fly in and out of their west side hub.

The captain at the helm of the Asiana flight when it crashed was finishing up his certification on the 777.

Powered by WorldNow