Indiana authorities have "eye in the sky" to track suspects - 13 WTHR Indianapolis

Indiana authorities have "eye in the sky" to track suspects

Posted: Updated:
The FBI released photos of two men suspected in explosions at Monday's Boston Marathon. The FBI released photos of two men suspected in explosions at Monday's Boston Marathon.
Investigators in Indianapolis have access to hundreds of cameras around the city. Investigators in Indianapolis have access to hundreds of cameras around the city.
INDIANAPOLIS -

With the images of the two suspects wanted in the bombings in Boston broadcast across the globe, Indianapolis' Division of Homeland Security says its just a matter of time before people here believe they have seen someone matching the men in those pictures.

"We'll do our due diligence to chase down any leads that we have. We don't have any reports that they would be here. We don't have any reason to believe that they'd be here, but I'm sure we'll get some reports throughout," said Chief Gary Coons.

If a similar attack happened in Indianapolis, Homeland Security officials said they have the same capabilities as investigators in Boston to capture images from hundreds of cameras all over the city that could be the break in their investigation.

"They're that eye in the sky that's just kind of watching out for everyone and you know, without 'em, you may not see something that occurs," explained Coons.

It's not just Homeland Security that has cameras investigators can use. Businesses do too, along with bank ATMs. Someone is always watching, just in case.

"The state has cameras. INDOT has cameras. Everybody has cameras," said Coons.

If cameras do catch something, officials have the capabilities, just like in the Boston investigation, to pour over endless hours of footage until they find what they're looking for to help them.

"We'll sit down with investigators and those that are part of the case and look at the footage and see if we can see what we are trying to look for, or if there's information that we're looking for within the video. We'll sit and monitor it to see if we find it," said Coons.

If they do, that's when investigators often turn to the public like they have in the Boston case to help them catch their suspects.

Powered by WorldNow