Bloomington man accused of cooking meth - 13 WTHR Indianapolis

Bloomington man accused of cooking meth while kids were in apartment

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Police say Michael Langley was cooking meth while his children were in the apartment. Police say Michael Langley was cooking meth while his children were in the apartment.
Miranda Cooper was disturbed to find out about the meth lab so close to home. Miranda Cooper was disturbed to find out about the meth lab so close to home.
BLOOMINGTON -

A man already in trouble with the law for making methamphetamine is once again behind bars for the same crime. This time police, along with the man's neighbors, are shocked about what else they found in his apartment.

"In this close and closed-in community it should not be going on period," said Miranda Cooper, a Bloomington mother.

Cooper had no idea she and her family came so close to a potential ticking time bomb. Indiana State Police disassembled a meth lab in a Bloomington apartment at North Arlington Park.

The lab had everything needed to spark an explosion not far from Stanley Parrot and his family too.

"That's not good. I love my kids and don't want anything to happen to them either. This is my grandchild," said Parrot.

Troopers, along with Bloomington Police, arrested 29-year-old Michael Langley.

The active meth lab inside apartment 602, according police, contained lithium, sodium, sulfuric acid, ammonium nitrate, fuel and starting fluid - all capable of creating a fire and igniting an explosion when mixed together.

Miranda Cooper wonders when it will stop.

"It's an epidemic. It's sad to say but the only way they will curb is if they do have a restriction where you have to have a doctor's statement to get the pseudo-ephedrine pills," she said. "I wouldn't want anyone's kids around it."

Living in the apartment with the meth lab were a four-year-old child and a newborn. Police say Langley even cooked the meth while the kids were there. Those children are in protective custody.

The chemicals used to make meth pose a hazard to people, especially children, who may inhale or even swallow the toxic chemicals. Chronic exposure can lead to cancer and brain damage, as well as a host of other health problems, including breathing and neurological complications.

"I hope that they are doing okay because of the chemicals which are absorbed through the skin and inhaled and everything else. My concern is for the kids," said Cooper.

As Langley's children get the medical attention they need, he remains in jail awaiting his day in court. Langley was already wanted on a 2012 warrant for making meth. Right now Langley's arrest charges stem from the meth lab, but Monroe County Prosecutors could stack on child endangerment charges as well.

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