IU Health Methodist, St. Vincent earn top hospital honors - 13 WTHR Indianapolis

IU Health Methodist, St. Vincent earn top hospital honors

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Dr. Archelle Georgiou Dr. Archelle Georgiou
INDIANAPOLIS -

Two central Indiana hospitals are among the top 100 hospitals in the country, according to a new report.

Healthgrades, an independent online ranking service, released the report Tuesday. Healthgrades uses federal data to compare and rank the quality of healthcare across the country.

IU Health Methodist Hospital, including University Hospital, and St. Vincent Hospital, including St. Vincent Women's Hospital, made the list as the top two percent of hospitals in the nation.

Dr. Archelle Georgiou talked with Eyewitness News about the criteria used to make the distinction.

"We look at data from all 4,500-plus hospitals in the country. That data is actually collected by the federal government. And we use that data to evaluate all those hospitals on their complication rates for certain procedures and then mortality rates or survival rates for other conditions and procedures," said Dr. Georgiou.

Georgiou says hospitals make the list for good success rates that stand the test of time.

"How well did they do on treating heart attack, heart failure, pneumonia, diabetes? What were the complication and survival rates with heart surgery, back surgery, knee surgery? So we look at a total of 27 different conditions. We identify those hospitals that have the best outcomes overall across a broad range of conditions," she said.

New research from Harris Interactive shows why providing consumers with these list is important. Eighty-one percent of Americans say in an emergency, they would ask an ambulance driver to take them to a better hospital even if it is further away, because they want higher quality care. Eighty-five percent say they would pick a surgeon they don't know at a hospital with higher quality outcomes than a surgeon they know at a hospital with poor quality rankings.

Healthgrades reports that from 2009 to 2011, if all hospitals performed at the level of the nation's best, the more than 165,000 deaths could have potentially been saved.

See the report here.

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