Local brewers keeping eye on Sunday sales debate - 13 WTHR Indianapolis

Local brewers keeping eye on Sunday sales debate

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Local breweries are legally allowed to sell carryout beer on Sundays. Local breweries are legally allowed to sell carryout beer on Sundays.
Brewers say Sundays are their busiest days, because of the law. Brewers say Sundays are their busiest days, because of the law.
Lawmakers are again debating allowing more establishments to sell carryout beer on Sundays. Lawmakers are again debating allowing more establishments to sell carryout beer on Sundays.
INDIANAPOLIS -

You may not be able to buy beer or wine at the grocery store on Sunday, but there are places where carry out is sold legally right now.

Local breweries are keeping a close eye on the Indiana Statehouse.

When it comes to libations, Brian Burton likes to keep it local.

"I do like my craft beer," he said.

With 59 craft breweries across the state, there is a growing variety for Burton to choose from.

"They make the best beer. Local ingredients, it tastes great," he said.

That insatiable appetite for craft beer is keeping Fountain Square Brewery busy and happy.

"We've grown every month, month after month," said Bill Webster with Fountain Square Brewery.

You can get a pint of the Fountain Square brew at more than 150 bars and restaurants across the state. But at the brewery, you can buy a growler to take home - even on Sunday - because it's produced on site.

Breweries have been allowed to sell carryout since July 2010.

"I would say it's our busiest day. We had to make changes in how we set up our bar in order to handle the volume," Webster said.

A change in Indiana law permitting Sunday carryout sales could impact business, but Webster doesn't expect a significant hit.

"We'll no longer be the only choice on Sunday, so there's a concern. It's a 'wait and see' kind of thing," Webster said.

At New Day Meadery, a change in the law doesn't matter quite as much. As a winery, they have been allowed to sell on Sundays since they opened in 2006.

"I don't think it will affect my business positively or negatively. Again, we have always had that privilege and I'm just excited to see my other colleagues get that opportunity, as well," said co-owner Tia Agnew.

Agnew says even if the law changes, people will still go to wineries and breweries for the experience and that's something she says you can't put in a bottle.

The Brewers of Indiana Guild tells Eyewitness News it will remain neutral in the Sunday sales debate out of respect for all the players involved.

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