City officials looking for solution to rising murder rate - 13 WTHR Indianapolis

City officials looking for solution to rising murder rate

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Five people have been murdered in the first 10 days of 2013. Five people have been murdered in the first 10 days of 2013.
Rev. Malachi Walker has a memorial in his home to his murdered daughter. Rev. Malachi Walker has a memorial in his home to his murdered daughter.
INDIANAPOLIS -

The new year has not gotten off to a good start for the murder rate in Indianapolis.

So far this year, on average, someone has been murdered on our streets every 48 hours.

Rev. Malachi Walker has a memorial at his home dedicated to his daughter, who was murdered July 19, 2008. Someone shot and killed Chanelle Denise Walker-Wells and police are still looking for who pulled the trigger.

"She was a bright young lady who had a future ahead of her. In fact, she had just graduated and gotten a degree," Walker said.

2013 has already gotten off to a deadly start in Indianapolis, with five murders in less than 10 days. Only one of them has been ruled self-defense.

Homicide detectives are trying to figure out who shot and killed 21-year-old Dominique Jenkins Tuesday night. That was followed by another murder Wednesday night.

"Who are the victims of homicides? Who are the perpetrators?" said Public Safety Director Troy Riggs.

After just a couple months on the job, Riggs is already asking questions and forming a game plan to lower the city's murder rate.

"It can not be done overnight, but what Chief (Rick) Hite and I are committed to doing is understanding 'What are the demographics to our homicides?'," Riggs said.

A big part of Riggs' plan will involve tracking other crimes. He says knowing what surrounds murder, be it drugs or domestic violence, will allow them to get specific neighborhoods involved in fighting crime.

After fighting for peace in the streets, only to lose his own daughter to violence, Walker prays that everyone will get involved to help make Indianapolis safer.

"We have to come together to make it happen," he said.

Riggs tells Eyewitness News if more communities and neighborhoods report crimes often surrounding murders, they have a better chance at lowering those numbers.

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