Seismographs show explosion timeline - 13 WTHR Indianapolis

Seismographs show explosion timeline

Posted: Updated:
Michael Michael
  • HeadlinesHeadlinesMore>>

  • Lack of psychiatrists hits mental health patients

    Lack of psychiatrists hits mental health patients

    Saturday, April 19 2014 9:55 AM EDT2014-04-19 13:55:06 GMT
    A nationwide shortage of psychiatrists is forcing many mentally ill Indiana patients to wait months for an appointment.The Health Resources and Services Administration reports more than half the state's counties have a shortage of mental health professionals. The Journal Courier has found there is just one psychiatrist for every 57,585 residents in Tippecanoe and surrounding counties.The shortage stems in part from low reimbursement rates by insurance companies. A private psychiatrist will m...More >>
    A nationwide shortage of psychiatrists is forcing many mentally ill Indiana patients to wait months for an appointment.The Health Resources and Services Administration reports more than half the state's counties have a shortage of mental health professionals. The Journal Courier has found there is just one psychiatrist for every 57,585 residents in Tippecanoe and surrounding counties.The shortage stems in part from low reimbursement rates by insurance companies. A private psychiatrist will m...More >>
  • Gap between Indiana wages, living costs grows

    Gap between Indiana wages, living costs grows

    Saturday, April 19 2014 9:35 AM EDT2014-04-19 13:35:47 GMT
    Indiana workers' pay didn't keep pace with inflation last year, and economic experts say the state needs to focus more on the quality of jobs instead of the quantity to close the distance.Hoosier workers saw a mere 0.8 percent increase in pay last year. But federal data released this month show inflation grew 1.4 percent in the Midwest.Business leaders tell the Indianapolis Business Journal (http://bit.ly/1hVKISa ) that a high number of job seekers has allowed many employers to hold down wage...More >>
    Indiana workers' pay didn't keep pace with inflation last year, and economic experts say the state needs to focus more on the quality of jobs instead of the quantity to close the distance.Hoosier workers saw a mere 0.8 percent increase in pay last year. But federal data released this month show inflation grew 1.4 percent in the Midwest.Business leaders tell the Indianapolis Business Journal (http://bit.ly/1hVKISa ) that a high number of job seekers has allowed many employers to hold down wage...More >>
  • A fantastic weekend on tap

    A fantastic weekend on tap

    Saturday, April 19 2014 7:13 AM EDT2014-04-19 11:13:13 GMT
    A spectacular weekend is on tap as dry weather dominants and the warming trend continues. An area of high pressure will slowly move over Quebec this weekend bringing central Indiana sunny skies and lightMore >>
    A spectacular weekend is on tap as dry weather dominants and the warming trend continues.
    More >>
INDIANAPOLIS -

The explosion on the south side Saturday was so powerful it showed up on earthquake monitors. That information could be critical to investigators.

"The house shook a little. I'm ten minutes away. I seriously thought something hit our house," said Marjorie Basey.

It also rocked the night.

"It definitely felt like something was hitting. The whole house shook," said Nick LaVell.

Dr. Michael Hamburger, a geologist at Indiana University, says "there was a lot of energy that went into the atmosphere, which all the neighbors and residents know."

That energy was picked up on earthquake-measuring devices at Franklin Central High School, seven miles from ground zero.

"It turns out the atmospheric wave, like a sonic boom, translates into vibrations. Our instruments in the ground picked it up," Hamburger said.

The earth shook, but it was the sound wave that really rocked the seismometer.

Hamburger showed us a graph with a small flutter of activity from the seismic pen.

"This first vibration," he said, "is actually the ground vibration. It arrives just a few seconds after 11:08 in the evening."

That time is significant. For the first time, we have a time stamp for the event measured by sensitive scientific equipment. Something that could be critical, especially if this becomes a criminal case.

"It looks to me that it must have been a pretty instantaneous thing," Dr. Hamburger said. "Just a fraction of a second."

Powered by WorldNow