Shoppers hit stores early in hopes of Black Friday deals - 13 WTHR Indianapolis

Shoppers hit stores early in hopes of Black Friday deals

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INDIANAPOLIS -

For many Indiana families, Thanksgiving has become a day of both family dinner and deals.

Retailers are getting a jump on Black Friday. Some started Thursday morning and others will jump into it later tonight.

Shoppers hit stores snapping up both Thanksgiving dinner and Christmas deals. Jessica Marmulewicz and her brother rushed through the grocery aisles at the south side Meijer.

"There are a few things we forgot yesterday so we have to get the last couple of things," she said.

By midday, shoppers all but cleaned out the store's supply of fresh turkeys and special offer iPods.

Retailers are finding increasing numbers of consumers wanting to spend at least part of a traditionally family holiday, hunting for bargains.

"It surprises you a little bit, but everybody is in a great mood. They are out there shopping. We have had no complaints today," said Dave Poletti, Meijer store manager.

More stores are starting Black Friday on Thursday by opening all day or beginning deep discount specials in the evening or at midnight.

All this may be good for you wallet, but is it good for you? Is there another price to be paid as the stores add stress to an already stressful holiday?

Keolani Lowe cashed in on Thanksgiving morning specials.

"Oh yes, shopping adds to the stress, definitely," admitted Lowe. But she felt it was worth it.

Mental health counselor Kimble Richardson isn't so sure the change is all good.

"It was a family holiday. It wasn't a time to get great bargains for Christmas," said Kimble Richardson, St. Vincent Stress Center.

Anthony and Cristiana Pierluissi are having the holiday both ways. Quick shopping on the way to dinner, then "after we celebrate Thanksgiving, then we all go out with my parents at midnight and stand in lines and do the whole thing together."

The National Retail Federation says over 150 million people will spend money on Christmas-related gifts this year. That's important, because 60 percent of the economy runs on consumers.

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