Teachers encourage more parents to get involved - 13 WTHR Indianapolis

Teachers encourage more parents to get involved

Posted: Updated:
INDIANAPOLIS -

Indiana's public school teachers are saying, "Where are the parents?"

In our exclusive Eyewitness News poll of 4,500 Indiana public school teachers, a significant numbers say more than a fourth of their students don't even do their homework on time.

These are teachers whose job security and salary can be affected by their student's standardized test scores. Yet an alarming number of them say students aren't doing home work and their parents aren't actively involved with their child's education.

Bev Simpson is as interesting and energetic as they come, yet even she has trouble convincing students to do basic homework.

"I'd say about 75 percent turn it in on time. More turn it in late," she said.

Many educators say it isn't fair that they alone are held accountable for their student's success. In our poll, three-fourths of teachers say no more than half of parents are actively involved in their children's educations.

Paris Holmes turned her classroom struggles into successes after her teacher began calling her parents.

"Paris is a smart girl," said Paris' teacher, Julia Poebos. "She needs to know parents are in her life to be successful. That will be a good thing."

Paris says those calls helped. "It helped my mom to help me more, and then that helped me more to do better and work and stuff."

Paris says those calls can sometimes be scary, but sometimes a little fear can be a good thing.

Jason Ramos he can't get away with anything now that he and his mom frequently share dinner and notes with classmates, parents and teacher.

"I can't get away with everything I could have, but at the same time it's good. If I am struggling, they can help me out. I have perspectives of other people," said Jason.

Jason changed his D's and F's into A's, B's and an occasional C.

You can take a look at the results of our survey by clicking here.

Note: This is the third part in a five-part series. Read parts one and two.

Read part four on teachers paying for classroom supplies out of pocket.

Powered by WorldNow