Muncie couple fights unfair towing - 13 WTHR Indianapolis

Muncie couple fights unfair towing

Updated:
Brandon and Regina Carroll had their car towed twice Friday. Brandon and Regina Carroll had their car towed twice Friday.
Their son, Tatin, has a severe medical condition that requires constant attention. Their son, Tatin, has a severe medical condition that requires constant attention.
Their car was towed while they visited with another family at Riley Hospital for Children. Their car was towed while they visited with another family at Riley Hospital for Children.

INDIANAPOLIS - The practice of unfair towing exposed by 13 Investigates is supposed to come to an end in ten days, when a new ordinance takes effect.

But a Muncie couple found that the practice may be alive and well in Indianapolis during a visit to the city with their sick child.

Part of the towing issue is that towing companies have been allowed to tow cars without approval from the property owner. It has been subjective and that is what happened Friday, stranding Brandon and Regina Carroll and their very sick child. Their car was towed twice Friday.

"There goes our car. They are taking it for the second time today," said Brandon Carroll.

Both sides - the towing company and the Carrolls - accuse the other of being in the wrong.

"They said that me and him both left the parking lot," Regina said.

Under normal circumstances, Eyewitness News would let the two fight it out in court, but the couple's child makes this case different.

"I have a baby that does go to Riley that needs medicine twice a day and he is on a feeding pump and I have no way of getting home and they want me to pay $175 for an illegal tow," Regina said.

Two-year-old Tatin Carroll, the couple's youngest child, has a severe medical condition that requires constant attention.

"The doctors told us the state that he is in, he has a 50-50 chance to live to the age of five," said .

The Carrolls had come to Indianapolis for a visit with another family whose child has the same condition. Regina Carroll said their son stayed with her in a shopping plaza while Brandon went to visit the family. Their car was towed an hour and a half later, with a $175 price tag to get it out.

"Now we are stuck with no way to get home, nobody to call," said .

The couple had pleaded with police and the owners of Interstate Towing, who towed the car, but to no avail. Eyewitness News called Interstate Towing to get some answers.

"We will take care of them," said an Interstate Towing employee.

An employee of the company came and picked the Carrolls up with our crews following to make sure they released the car at no charge.

The new ordinance will lower towing and storage fees, hours of enforcement have to be posted and the towing companies have to accept debit cards and ensure you can get your car at any time, day or night.

Powered by WorldNow