Free cancer screenings available in May - 13 WTHR Indianapolis

Free cancer screenings available in May

In 2007, more than one million cases of basal cell or squamos cell cancers will occur in the U.S. In 2007, more than one million cases of basal cell or squamos cell cancers will occur in the U.S.

Indianapolis - The American Cancer Society's Central Indiana Area Service Center is currently scheduling appointments for FREE skin cancer screenings at participating health care facilities throughout the month of May.

In 2007, more than one million cases of basal cell or squamos cell cancers will occur in the U.S. Of those, nearly 60,000 will be diagnosed as melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. More than 1,200 Hoosiers are expected to be diagnosed with melanoma this year. However, melanoma can be highly curable when detected early.

Following are the locations throughout Central Indiana offering FREE skin cancer screenings:

May 2, St. Vincent Breast Center - Indianapolis, 5:30 - 7 p.m.
May 3, Johnson Memorial Hospital, 5 - 8 p.m.
May 4, Regional Cancer Center at Morgan Hospital and Medical Center, Noon - 1 p.m. May 5, Hendricks Regional Health - Plainfield, 7:30 - 11:30 a.m. May 7, Indiana University Hospital, 7:30 - 9:30 a.m.
May 9, St. Vincent - Carmel, 6 - 7:30 p.m.
May 10, Community Regional Cancer Care, 5 - 7 p.m.
May 11, Regional Cancer Center at Morgan Hospital and Medical Center, Noon - 1 p.m.
May 12, St. Francis Hospitals - Indianapolis, 9 a.m. - Noon May 12, Hendricks Regional Health - Avon, 8 a.m. - Noon
May 12, Witham Memorial Hospital, 8 a.m. - Noon
May 15, St. Francis Hospitals - Mooresville, 5 - 8:30 p.m.
May 15, Community Hospital East, 5 - 7 p.m.
May 16, St. Vincent Fishers Medical Building, 6 - 7:30 p.m.
May 17, Ball Memorial Hospital, 6 - 7:30 p.m.
May 18, Regional Cancer Center at Morgan Hospital and Medical Center, Noon - 1 p.m.
May 19, St. Vincent Breast Center - Indianapolis, 8 a.m. - Noon
May 22, Methodist Hospital, 5:30 - 7 p.m.

Hoosiers interested in scheduling an appointment to have suspicious patches of skin checked should call the American Cancer Society at 1.800.ACS.2345. Appointments will be scheduled on a first-come, first-serve basis until all slots are filled.

The best way to detect skin cancer early is to recognize changes in skin growths or the appearance of new growths, which may include: any changes on the skin, especially in the size of a mole or other darkly pigmented growth or spot; scaliness, oozing, bleeding or changes in the appearance of a bump or nodule; the spread of pigmentation beyond its border; or a change in sensation, itchiness, tenderness or pain. Adults should examine their skin reguarly and report any suspicious lesions or progressive change in a lesion's appearance or size to a physician.

The American Cancer Society is dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem by saving lives, diminishing suffering and preventing cancer through research, education, advocacy and service. Founded in 1913 and with national headquarters in Atlanta, the Society has 13 regional Divisions and local offices in 4,300 communities, involving millions of volunteers across the United States. For more information anytime, call toll free 1-800-ACS-2345 or visit www.cancer.org.

(Press release)

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