Putin speaks about crash for the first time

Nearly 300 civilians died in Thursday's plane crash.
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For the first time since the crash of Malaysia Airlines flight 17, Russian President Vladimir Putin made public statements Monday calling for a complete investigation into what happened.

President Obama said Monday Putin is responsible for getting separatists in eastern Ukraine to give complete access to the wreckage site.

"All of which begs the question: What are they trying to hide?...Given its direct influence over the separatists, Russia - and President Putin in particular - has direct responsibility to compel them to cooperate with the investigation."

The crash killed an IU student and nearly 300 others. The United Nations Monday demanded investigators get full access.

"We must have answers," said Julie Bishop, Australian Minister of Foreign Affairs. "We must have justice."

Ukranian separatists made a deal with Malaysia to finally let the train they say contains 200 sets of remains leave the region of the crash so the remains can head back to Amsterdam. The rebels agreed to turn over the flight data and voice recorders from Flight 17 to Malaysian Airlines officials.
 
US intelligence concluded that a Russian-made rocket sent to Ukraine by Russia and fired by troops trained by Russia brought down Malaysian Flight 17. Some Republicans have said pro-Russian militias in the area need to be neutralized.
 
"And if the President decides to move forward on arming Ukraine and everything else, he'll have the support of Congress," Rep. Adam Kinzinger (R-Ill.) said Monday on MSNBC.
 
For now, President Obama is focused on the investigation, according to aides, and is is considering tougher sanctions on Russia.

As the investigation continues overseas, we're learning more about the IU student killed when the plane went down. Karlijn Keijzer from Amsterdam was pursuing her doctorate in chemistry at Bloomington. The 25-year-old's parents posted a message to her Facebook page after hearing she was on board the downed flight, saying, "Our beautiful, lively, brilliant daughter Karlijn was in the plane that crashed, together with her boyfriend Laurens."

The couple was on summer vacation together at the time of the crash. Keijzer planned to return to IU in the fall.