Kinesiology tape aids rehabbing seniors

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Remember the bandages that looked like pieces of tape that you saw on Olympic athletes in Rio? It's called Kinesiology tape, and it's not just for Olympians.

The tape is used for other forms of rehabilitation, and helping people like Joel Draper.

Draper is now moving around nearly pain-free.

He worked to save his leg for three years, but decided amputation was needed in early July because of bone degeneration due to diabetes.

“We've spoken to amputees who said you wished you'd done this three years ago," Draper said, "because this makes you so much better, physically, mentally, so we decided to do that. And what they say is true.”

After his amputation, Draper's left leg, that he calls his power leg, was experiencing extra pressure.

His physical therapist at Zionsville Meadows, an American Senior Community, pulled out Kinesiology tape to help.

“It was instant relief,” Draper said. “The catch that was in my knee just almost disappeared, I could still feel it, but the pain was non-existent.”

So, how does the tape work?

The Kinesiology tape is engineered with tension, and it allows the body to naturally heal.

It's latex-free and non-medicinal, making it safe to use on almost any patient.

Ashley Marshall, the Rehabilitation Services Manager at Zionsville Meadows, said the tape functions as "an aid to our body's natural set up to really just provide some more support, more structure, and go from there.”

The results are quick, and one application can last a few days.

“It really helps the body naturally hold those muscle postures," Marshall said. "The pain receptors isn't as tough on them, so it's really effective across the board. We see a lot of further improvement from a pain relief standpoint, range of motion improvement, mobility overall.”

Joel's physical therapist knows where to place the tape to help the muscles that are sore.

Just taping helped with his pain, the stress on his muscles, and his muscle alignment.

“I'm an advocate of keeping your medications to a minimum, I certainly take plenty of medications, so to remove the Hydrocodone, and the various things I was taking to alleviate the pain was very comforting for me,” Draper said.

American Senior Communities is participating in A Fair to Remember, a health and wellness event coming up Friday September 9th at the Indiana State Fairgrounds.

The cost is only $8, and you'll have access to health screenings and experts.

Actor Henry Winkler will be the headline speaker.

You must register by this Friday.